Saturday, July 26, 2014

"The recent release of “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes" reminded me of one of my favorite ape vs. man films – this 1932 video that shows a baby chimpanzee and a baby human undergoing the same basic psychological tests.
Its gets weirder – the human baby (Donald) and the chimpanzee baby (Gua) were both raised as humans by their biological/adopted father Winthrop Niles Kellogg.  Kellogg was a comparative psychologist fascinated by the interplay between nature and nurture, and he devised a fascinating (and questionably ethical) experiment to study it:
Suppose an anthropoid were taken into a typical human family at the day of birth and reared as a child. Suppose he were fed upon a bottle, clothed, washed, bathed, fondled, and given a characteristically human environment; that he were spoken to like the human infant from the moment of parturition; that he had an adopted human mother and an adopted human father.
First, Kellogg had to convince his pregnant wife he wasn’t crazy:
 …the enthusiasm of one of us met with so much resistance from the other that it appeared likely we could never come to an agreement upon whether or not we should even attempt such an undertaking.
She apparently gave in, because Donald and Gua were raised, for nine months, as brother and sister. Much like Caesar in the “Planet of the Apes” movies, Gua developed faster than her “brother,” and often outperformed him in tasks. But she soon hit a cognitive wall, and the experiment came to an end. (Probably for the best, as Donald had begun to speak chimpanzee.)
You can read more about Kellogg’s experiment, its legacy, and public reaction to it here."
For this series, photographer An-Sofie Kesteleyn traveled from Ohio to Texas to photograph kids with guns. Crickett rifles are designed for children between the ages of five and twelve. The .22-calibre guns are lightweight, made to smaller proportions, and come in a variety of colors. For me, the innocence and potential of youth is a clear symbol of hope – and a gun, no matter what its size or color, is a symbol of death and destruction, the very antithesis of hope.
Photo credit: An-Sofie Kesteleyn
Full set on my Blogspot

For this series, photographer An-Sofie Kesteleyn traveled from Ohio to Texas to photograph kids with guns. Crickett rifles are designed for children between the ages of five and twelve. The .22-calibre guns are lightweight, made to smaller proportions, and come in a variety of colors. For me, the innocence and potential of youth is a clear symbol of hope – and a gun, no matter what its size or color, is a symbol of death and destruction, the very antithesis of hope.

Photo credit: An-Sofie Kesteleyn

Trouxas III (Alusivo ao Artur Barrio) / Óleo sobre Tela / 190 x 230 cm / 2013. One of the grotesque and hyper-realist paintings of Brazilian artist Fábio Magalhães.

Trouxas III (Alusivo ao Artur Barrio) / Óleo sobre Tela / 190 x 230 cm / 2013. One of the grotesque and hyper-realist paintings of Brazilian artist Fábio Magalhães.
Budd–Chiari syndrome with thrombosis of the inferior vena cava. Budd–Chiari syndrome is a condition caused by occlusion of the hepatic veins that drain the liver.

Budd–Chiari syndrome with thrombosis of the inferior vena cava. Budd–Chiari syndrome is a condition caused by occlusion of the hepatic veins that drain the liver.

Friday, July 25, 2014

This early form of anaesthesia, a chloroform machine, was called the Dubois Inhaler and was operated using a crank. C. 1905. This early form of  

anaesthesia, a chloroform machine, was called the Dubois Inhaler and was operated using a crank. C. 1905
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